What Exactly is going on in Tokyo Right Now? →

aechlys:

Ok kids, listen up. I’m about to explain to you, to the best of my ability, why there are 40,000 people protesting in Tokyo’s Nagata-cho as I type this, why it matters, and why you should be talking about it, too.

image

What Started This Protest?

The short answer —> Japan’s Prime…

marzi-pan:

Webcomics to read! (Every synopsis is taken directly from the webcomic site or from tvtropes.com)

Ava’s Demon- Science fiction and fantasy, multimedia webcomic about a girl named Ava and the demon haunting her. The demon happens to be the ghost of an alien queen, Wrathia, seeking revenge on the one that destroyed her empire, a god-like figure named Titan. The story follows Ava as she makes her way across the universe, teaming up with the demon haunting her on a quest for revenge, while fighting her own inner demons along the way.

Blindsprings- An all ages comic, featuring magic, secret societies and hidden gateways to fantastic places. The comic should appeal to anyone who loves Ghibli or Disney animated movies!

Cucumber Quest- Cucumber Quest is a comic about bunny kids going on adventures and having fun.

Knights Errant- TBA
I recommend you read the original and the reboot (link in title.)

Lackadaisy- Set in the year of 1920 in Prohibition-era St. Louis, the comic follows the antics and adventures of a group of anthropomorphic cats as well as a notorious underground speakeasy set up by a character by the name of Atlas May in order to sell alchoholic beverages to people in secret.

Lucky Penny- The book is about an unlucky girl trying to figure stuff out. The humor is pretty similar to Johnny Wander.

Monster Pop!- Acomic about two best friends and the slice of life adventures they share! Monster Pop! is set in an alternate Earth where monsters coexist with humans; sometimes they integrate well, sometimes they clash. This comic is heavily influenced by shoujo manga. Monster Pop! includes musical and interactive elements: Every now and then there will be a page with animation and/or music and most of the main characters have their own blogs.

Nimona- Lord Ballister Blackheart has a point to make, and his point is that the good guys aren’t as good as they seem. He makes a comfortable living as a supervillain, but never really seems to accomplish much - until he takes on a new sidekick, Nimona, a shapeshifter with her own ideas of how things should be done. Unfortunately, most of those ideas involve blowing things up. Now Ballister must teach his young protégé some restraint and try to keep her from destroying everything, while simultaneously attempting to expose the dark dealings of those who claim to be the protectors of the kingdom - including his former best friend turned nemesis, Ambrosius Goldenloin.

Saint for Rent- Saint runs an inn for Time Travelers, which leaves him little time to write his trashy romance novels. Always a pit stop in the crisscrossing lives of his out-of-date friends and family, Saint wonders where his place is in a world that’s quickly passing him by. Unfortunately, he also attracts the more… supernatural “guests,” too.

Sonnet- An ongoing comic project, introducing a collection of fairytales and short stories told through poetry and illustration.

The Property of Hate- A young girl is suddenly awoken by a strange man who refers to himself simply as RGB. He is formal in speech and odd in the head, or in the television set where his head should be. He asks her if she would like to become a hero, and though she answers with gusto, she doesn’t have any knowledge of what will be expected of her as she leaves her home for a world in the skies.

(via toughtink)

Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop (9.25.14): Protesters in Ferguson are back out tonight, demanding Police Chief Jackson’s resignation and the immediate arrest of Mike Brown’s killer, Darren Wilson. #staywoke #farfromover

(Source: socialjusticekoolaid)

elisdraws:

a hedgehog

elisdraws:

a hedgehog

(via deputyeyebrows)

neenya:

bigangry:

musicfoundme:

IF YOU WANNA BE MY LOVER

YOU GOTTA tell me really explicitely because I can’t tell when people are actually flirting with me

 (Via canaa)

zig-a-zig ahhhhh *jazz hands*

isozyme:

you: hey isozyme, what do you want most in this world?

me: project runway AUs in every fandom

(via allyarra)

(Source: lamelamorsa, via toastygenius)

Banned Books Week: Day One →

teethingontigers:

"When I first picked up Neil Gaiman’s Coraline (2002) in the Young Adult section of my local library, I remember thinking to myself, “This will be a very frightening book.” This thought excited me, as it often does around that teen-age when you begin to actively seek out the things that frighten you. Coraline seemed to me a darker retelling of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, with the perfect balance of whimsy and darkness only Gaiman can execute so effortlessly. I have never thought of Coraline as a young-adult novel, because Coraline, like so many of her YA protagonist counterparts, must face challenges that would defeat most adults. Though she is a young child, Coraline is far more mature and self-aware than most of the adults in the novel, and yet she’s still able to bring joy and silliness to the most horrifying of situations. Within the twisted, fantastical world of the Other Mother, Coraline is given the option of remaining within the dreamscape, constantly refabricated to suit Coraline’s desires and dreams—she can remain, as it were, in the rabbit hole. At a price, that is. Yet Coraline chooses not to be blinded by her own selfish desires, no matter how fluorescent and enamoring they may be. She cares too deeply about her parents, and the other children that have been exploited by the Other Mother, and her friend the Cat. She even possesses sympathy for the Other Father, an amorphous phantasm of her father the Other Mother discards once he’s served his purpose. At the climax of the story, when Coraline has the option to end the nightmarish pursuit of the Other Mother and give into the fantasy, Coraline sagely remarks, “‘I don’t want whatever I want. Nobody does. Not really. What kind of fun would it be if I just got everything I ever wanted, just like that, and it didn’t mean anything? What then?’” (Gaiman 2002). It’s a simple sentiment the book slowly builds around, one that resonates with life-long ethics of gratitude, hard work and not expecting that the world necessarily owes you something.

Coraline also has one of the most profound passages about bravery that I’ve ever read. She tells the Cat a story about when she and her father went exploring in an old rubbish dump and accidentally stumble across a wasp’s nest. Coraline’s father scoops her up and carries her to safety, though he gets stung by many wasps in the process. During the escape, her father loses his glasses and has to return to the wasp’s nest to retrieve them. Coraline says, “’It wasn’t brave because he wasn’t scared: it was the only thing he could do. But going back again to get his glasses, when he knew the wasps were there, when he was really scared. That was brave.’ ‘Because,’ she said, ‘when you’re scared but you still do it anyway, that’s brave” (Gaiman 2002). Being fearless doesn’t make you brave, but rather acknowledging the fear and not letting it own you demonstrates courage. As a reader, the novel is truly terrifying, for the trials that Coraline has to undergo are the stuff of nightmares. Even after it seems that Coraline has escaped the clutches of the Other Mother and saved the souls of the forgotten children, she is still called upon to be brave, though no one within her own world understands or acknowledges her courage. The invisible acts of bravery and charity our lives are built around.

Coraline remains one of my favorite books, enduring for its charm, sly sense of humor and candor about the night-side of life. The frightening elements of Coraline are what make it so mesmerizing, as they teach us how misunderstood the darkness truly is and how much we can cope with and overcome. As Gaiman prefaces the book, dragons, darkness, violence and fear are all very real and necessary parts of our world, whether adult or otherwise. But dragons can also be vanquished, doors closed on the scuttling, malicious things that populate our nightmares and waking reality. That is a lesson worth learning, and one I continue to learn every day since I first finished the book.”

(via neil-gaiman)

teen wolf meets cards against humanity

(Source: hoechloin, via officerstilinskihale)

socialjusticekoolaid:

HAPPENING NOW (9.24.14): The situation in Ferguson is escalating quickly. Protests continue, following this morning’s burning of a Mike Brown memorial, and another frustrating Ferguson City Council meeting.Looks like the same “antagonize over de-escalate” tactics are back online. Prayers to all those out in the street of Ferguson right now fighting for their right to exist. #staywoke #farfromover (PT IPT IIPT III)  

Bringing back the dogs, choppers, charging the crowd, attempting to bottleneck protesters into an area, AND live shots possible fired into the crowd… what the ever-living fuck is Ferguson PD trying to do?! We’re a month and a half into this saga, and they still don’t know how to de-escalate a situation. Pray y’all. That might be all we got right now.

(via queerly-it-is)

mrjakeparker:

Inktober is a week away and I’ve been getting lots of questions about what tools I use and recommend for inking. So I made a list of the essentials. Go to www.mrjakeparker.com/inktober for Inktober rules and resources. #inktober 
Pigma MicronThe best pen to start inking with. They have a tough felt tip that draws a firm mark and are great for understanding the basics of laying a line down.
Uni Pin PenAn alternative to the Pigma. Tips feel a little looser.
Pigma Brush PenA good intro to drawing with a looser line. Tip is felt and can fray over the course of several drawings. Is recommended for larger drawings. Hard to get detailed with it.
Kuretake Fudegokochi Brush Pen - RegularThis is a molded felt tip which means it’s sturdy like the Pigmas but you get a more expressive line like the brush pens. Ink is nice and dark.
Pentel XFL2L Scientific Brush - Medium SizeThis pen is a great introduction to drawing with a brush tip. It’s tip is composed of nylon fibers and are filled with aqueous dye-based inks and dry extremely dark. You can get the finest of lines and the thickest of strokes with this. Pentel also has these in two other sizes I believe. Plus it has ink refills.
Pentel Pocket Brush PenMy work horse. Also a nylon brush tip, it offers a smooth and powerful line and can also give you fun expressive lines too. I’ve been drawing with this pen for years and it holds up to a beating, yet will still give you a fine delicate line if you need it. I highly reccommend it.
Kuretake No. 13 Fountain Brush PenI just got this pen and it’s beautiful. The lines are rich yet sharp. It’s great for details and broad strokes. The pen has a little more weight to it so you feel like you’re actually holding something. The fine nylon bristles have a satisfying snap to it allowing you to intuitively move from thick to thin. I love it.
Winsor & Newton Series 7 Kolinsky Sable Water Colour Brush size 1This is what brush pens wish they were. This is the gold standard, Rolls Royce of inking tools. It’s the brush Bill Watterson drew Calvin and Hobbes with. No nylon, synthetics, or plastic here, just wood, metal, and hair. There’s nothing quite like drawing with one. The ONLY draw back is you have to dip is in ink, which can get tedious, especially while under a deadline.

mrjakeparker:

Inktober is a week away and I’ve been getting lots of questions about what tools I use and recommend for inking. So I made a list of the essentials.

Go to www.mrjakeparker.com/inktober for Inktober rules and resources. #inktober

  1. Pigma Micron
    The best pen to start inking with. They have a tough felt tip that draws a firm mark and are great for understanding the basics of laying a line down.
  2. Uni Pin Pen
    An alternative to the Pigma. Tips feel a little looser.
  3. Pigma Brush Pen
    A good intro to drawing with a looser line. Tip is felt and can fray over the course of several drawings. Is recommended for larger drawings. Hard to get detailed with it.
  4. Kuretake Fudegokochi Brush Pen - Regular
    This is a molded felt tip which means it’s sturdy like the Pigmas but you get a more expressive line like the brush pens. Ink is nice and dark.
  5. Pentel XFL2L Scientific Brush - Medium Size
    This pen is a great introduction to drawing with a brush tip. It’s tip is composed of nylon fibers and are filled with aqueous dye-based inks and dry extremely dark. You can get the finest of lines and the thickest of strokes with this. Pentel also has these in two other sizes I believe. Plus it has ink refills.
  6. Pentel Pocket Brush Pen
    My work horse. Also a nylon brush tip, it offers a smooth and powerful line and can also give you fun expressive lines too. I’ve been drawing with this pen for years and it holds up to a beating, yet will still give you a fine delicate line if you need it. I highly reccommend it.
  7. Kuretake No. 13 Fountain Brush Pen
    I just got this pen and it’s beautiful. The lines are rich yet sharp. It’s great for details and broad strokes. The pen has a little more weight to it so you feel like you’re actually holding something. The fine nylon bristles have a satisfying snap to it allowing you to intuitively move from thick to thin. I love it.
  8. Winsor & Newton Series 7 Kolinsky Sable Water Colour Brush size 1This is what brush pens wish they were. This is the gold standard, Rolls Royce of inking tools. It’s the brush Bill Watterson drew Calvin and Hobbes with. No nylon, synthetics, or plastic here, just wood, metal, and hair. There’s nothing quite like drawing with one. The ONLY draw back is you have to dip is in ink, which can get tedious, especially while under a deadline.

(via agentotter)